Hamilton Book Launch

Date: November 8
Time: 7pm
Location: Room 1010, Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Learning (MDCL), McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario

Join author and activist Scott Neigh for a talk and book signing as he launches two new books published by Fernwood Publishing: Gender and Sexuality: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists and Resisting the State: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists. Hear about some of the many struggles that have shaped the Canada of today, and talk about new ways of relating to the past as we struggle for a transformed tomorrow.

To learn more about the books and the project of which they are a part, and to read and hear excerpts from the interviews around which the books are organized, visit here. To find out about ways to purchase the books if you can’t make it to the launch, click here.

From the book jackets:

We usually learn our history from the perspective of our rulers — from the top down. In these books we learn about our history from the perspectives of ordinary people — from the bottom up. Whatever liberty and justice that communities, workplaces and individuals in Canada enjoy are due to the many struggles and social movements in our country’s history. Yet the stories and histories of those movements to overcome racism, sexism, and poverty, for example, remain largely untold, thanks to the single, simplistic national story taught to us in school. Deftly combining history with accounts from participants in social movements, Neigh introduces us to the untold histories of activists, histories that encourage all of us to engage in struggles that will shape our shared tomorrow.

Gender and Sexuality unearths a diverse spectrum of struggle through the accounts of longstanding social movement participants. From indigenous women working against colonization and Christian women trying to end sexism and homophobia in their churches, to gay men opposing sexual oppression and women fighting against hostile employers and violence, this book reveals the ways that oppressions based on gender and sexuality — and the struggles against them — have shaped our society.

In Resisting the State, Neigh details the histories of a broad range of social movements and provides readers with a richer understanding of the Canadian state and why so many people — including military draftees, welfare recipients, workers, indigenous people, psychiatric survivors, immigrants and refugees — have struggled, and continue to struggle, for equality and justice for all members of society.

What people are saying about Gender and Sexuality and Resisting the State:

“Never doubt that a few committed people can change Canada (and the world) for the better. Scott Neigh’s oral histories show not only the power of committed idealism, but also how the history of our whole country has been shaped by brave Canadians who refuse to accept the misery and injustice that surrounds us. Read these books to learn how the history of social change organizing is indeed the history of Canada — and then go out and start making your own history.” — Jim Stanford, union economist and peace activist

“This work is a treasure that provides a portal to Canadian history, bringing it alive and urgent through the voices and profound insights of veteran social justice activists, an indispensable guide for present and future generations to carry on these struggles.” — Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, veteran activist and author

And even more.

Scott Neigh is a writer, parent, and activist currently based in Sudbury, Ontario. He lived in Hamilton, Ontario, from 1993 until 2004, where he was active in student, anti-poverty, anti-racism, environmental, and other social justice organizing, including as a board member of OPIRG McMaster. He blogs regularly on political topics at A Canadian Lefty in Occupied Land. You can learn more about these books and the project of which they are a part at the Talking Radical site, and more about Scott here.

This event is sponsored by OPIRG McMaster, Bryan Prince Bookseller, and Fernwood Publishing.

Posted in Event | 1 Comment

Talking Radical Radio on iTunes!

You can now subscribe to the podcast of Talking Radical Radio via iTunes!

And of course TRR_logo_100x100there are numerous other ways to listen, including these station that broadcast it and Rabble.ca for the podcast.

Posted in Radio | Tagged | Leave a comment

Radio — Mining justice: Local work in a global struggle

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, Beth Dollaga talks about the work of the Mining Justice Alliance, a Vancouver-based coalition with a global analysis that works to oppose the harms caused by Canadian extractive industries.

When it comes to mining and other forms of resource extraction, Canada is something of a superpower. While our current government goes to great lengths to emphasize (some would say “exaggerate”) the economic importance of such activities, residents of many frontline communities point out the accompanying horrendous damage to the environment and health and, often, violations of the rights of Indigenous peoples — not only here in Canada, but by companies based here that are at work in every corner of the earth.

The Mining Justice Alliance is a coalition of groups and individuals committed to working against the many injustices fostered by the mining industry, with an understanding of the causes and impacts of those injustices that is resolutely global. They prioritize the perspectives and social justice concerns of frontline affected communities, particularly indigenous communities; seeing the connections between abuses in the Global South and institutions, laws, and practices found in Canada; and working to challenge the devastating impacts that so often produced by the mining industry. We spoke about the group, the broader political context, and the struggle against what they describe as “endemic injustice within Canada’s state-supported mining industry.”

To learn more about the Mining Justice Alliance, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Sudbury, Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Exposing and challenging environmental racism in Nova Scotia

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, Ingrid Waldron and Lorne Julien talk about the Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities and Community Health — or ENRICH — Project, which aims to understand the health impacts of environemtnal racism on African Nova Scotian and Mi’qmak communities, and to support their struggles against it.

One of the many manifestations of how our lives, our communities, and our spaces are organized in colonial and racist ways is that, quite consistently across North America, environmentally hazardous land uses are more likley to be sited closer to and more densely in and around communities that are predominantly not white. Nova Scotia has relatively spatially distnct racialized communities, compared to many other parts of the country — in particular, longstanding African Nova Scotian communities and Mi’kmaq communities. And, tragically true to form, more sources of pollution have ended up being situated in and next to these communities than in and next to predominantly white spaces in the province.

Ingrid Waldron is a sociologist who is a professor in the School of Nursing at Dalhousie University in Halifax. She is the lead researcher in the ENRICH Project, which aims to collect solid data about the health impacts of this inequitable distribution of hazards, to build community awareness and community organizing capacity, and to help catalyze cross-community alliances to respond to it. Lorne Julien is an artist, a member of Millbrook First Nation, and a community participant in the ENRICH Project. They talk with me about environmental racism in Nova Scotia, about the effected communities, about the project, and about how they see that work fitting into broader efforts to challenge environmental racism in the province.

To learn more about the ENRICH Project, click here. (As well, to take a look at Julien’s art, you can click here.)

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Sudbury, Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Uncovering Calgary’s queer history

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, Teresa Maillie and Kevin Allen talk about their efforts to unearth the histories of queer lives and struggles in Calgary, and why that history matters for the future.

Calgary is a somewhat newer city than many of the other major cities in Canada. It is also a distinctively conservative one. And yet, the tides of struggle and profound change in gay, lesbian, bi, and queer lives over the last 50 years — profound even if much less evenly distributed across queer lives than more privileged observers often care to acknowledge — was no less generated from and experienced in queer communities in Calgary than anywhere else in the country. The local manifestations of this history are not, however, well known, within Calgary or without.

Maillie and Allen are both involved with the Calgary Gay History Project, a community-based effort to try to change that. Mailie is one of its researcher-volunteers and Allen is its research-lead and founder. They have been interviewing LGBTQ community elders, pouring over archives both private and public, and bringing their findings to audiences online and in person. They talk with me about how they’re doing this research, about what they’ve found, and about why knowing where you came from is key to facing the struggles yet to come.

To learn more about the Calgary Gay History Project, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Sudbury, Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Meet the group that put abortion access back on the New Brunswick agenda

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, Kathleen Pye talks about the rapid formation and growth of the group Reproductive Justice New Brunswick, and their success in putting access to abortion on the agenda in the province’s recent provincial election in a way that has not happened in many years, if ever.

New Brunswick has been, for a long time, among the most restrictive jurisdictions in the country in terms of access to abortion — restrictive because of provincial regulations that placed greater burdens on people needing the procedure than in most other places, because of a very limited number of locations to get the procedure done, and because of a broader culture that has been less supportive of women’s right to choose than some other parts of the country. Early in 2014, the only site to access the procedure in Fredericton (and one of the few in the province as a whole) closed, spurring feminists and allies to action.

Along with intensive strategizing about how to open a new clinic — with a new and more sustainable model of operating — the group has been very focused on winning a repeal to the highly restrictive regulations that have been in place in New Brunswick since the 1990s. A major element in their strategy for doing so was doing everything they could to put access to abortion front and centre in public discussions in the recent provincial election — something they were remarkably successful in doing. This interview was recorded a few days before the September 22nd victory of the pro-choice (albeit somewhat vague) Liberals over the incumbent Conservatives. In the interview, Pye talks about the kinds of restrictions that exist in New Brunswick, about the intense scramble of activity by feminists since the closure of the clinic, and about the significant steps they have already made in advancing reproductive health and reproductive justice in New Brunswick.

To learn more about Reproductive Justice New Brunswick, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Sudbury, Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — The policing of protest: From bad to worse

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, anti-poverty organizer and sociologist Lesley Wood talks about her new book, Crisis and Control: The Militarization of Protest Policing from Between The Lines Books.

Wood has been involved in struggles against poverty and for global justice for many years, and her teaching and research at York University have largely focused on social movements. In her new book, she looks at how the policing of protest in North America has shifted in recent decades. She points out that even those of us in movements who do pay some critical attention to policing don’t often do a good job of understanding in grounded ways how the police work as an institution. And given that we are in an era in which unmet human needs are growing while the willingness of state institutions to respond to popular demands by actually meeting needs is shrinking, as well as an era of repressive police response to popular protest in settings as varied as Toronto at the G20 summit in 2010 and Ferguson, Missouri much more recently, research liks Wood’s may just be what movements need to get a better sense of what exactly we’re up against. Wood talks with me about her research, about how police forces work, about the kinds of oppressive things they do both in their everyday presence in communities and in the face of popular protest, about how that has shifted in recent years, and about ways that movements can respond.

To learn more about Crisis and Control: The Militarization of Protest Policing by Lesley Wood, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Sudbury, Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Radio — A vision of community-controlled, multi-media centres across the country

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, Cathy Edwards, the executive director of Canadian Association of Community Television Users and Stations (CACTUS), talks about the work her organization is doing to bring about a new era for community media in Canada.

The members of CACTUS have a vision. It is a vision of community-based and community-controlled media centres in big cities and small towns across the country. These centres would not only give ordinary people access to the airwaves. They would also be hubs for providing infrastucture and training to build capacity in communities around creating all manner of media, including text, audio, and video, and using the entire range of online platforms through which such things get published, circulated, and consumed in the Internet age. They are taking a multi-pronged approach: pushing for regulatory changes, making use of thus-far unused sections of existing regulations, and working to catalyze the development of such centres in the here and now. And they even have a plan for how such community-controlled media infrascture could be sustainably funded. Edwards talks with me about the origins of CACTUS, about the evolving community broadcast media landscape in Canada, and about their plans to ensure that a broad range of ordinary people have access to the means to make all sorts of grassroots media.

To learn more about CACTUS and their work, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Sudbury, Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment