Hamilton Book Launch

Date: November 8
Time: 7pm
Location: Room 1010, Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Learning (MDCL), McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario

Join author and activist Scott Neigh for a talk and book signing as he launches two new books published by Fernwood Publishing: Gender and Sexuality: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists and Resisting the State: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists. Hear about some of the many struggles that have shaped the Canada of today, and talk about new ways of relating to the past as we struggle for a transformed tomorrow.

To learn more about the books and the project of which they are a part, and to read and hear excerpts from the interviews around which the books are organized, visit here. To find out about ways to purchase the books if you can’t make it to the launch, click here.

From the book jackets:

We usually learn our history from the perspective of our rulers — from the top down. In these books we learn about our history from the perspectives of ordinary people — from the bottom up. Whatever liberty and justice that communities, workplaces and individuals in Canada enjoy are due to the many struggles and social movements in our country’s history. Yet the stories and histories of those movements to overcome racism, sexism, and poverty, for example, remain largely untold, thanks to the single, simplistic national story taught to us in school. Deftly combining history with accounts from participants in social movements, Neigh introduces us to the untold histories of activists, histories that encourage all of us to engage in struggles that will shape our shared tomorrow.

Gender and Sexuality unearths a diverse spectrum of struggle through the accounts of longstanding social movement participants. From indigenous women working against colonization and Christian women trying to end sexism and homophobia in their churches, to gay men opposing sexual oppression and women fighting against hostile employers and violence, this book reveals the ways that oppressions based on gender and sexuality — and the struggles against them — have shaped our society.

In Resisting the State, Neigh details the histories of a broad range of social movements and provides readers with a richer understanding of the Canadian state and why so many people — including military draftees, welfare recipients, workers, indigenous people, psychiatric survivors, immigrants and refugees — have struggled, and continue to struggle, for equality and justice for all members of society.

What people are saying about Gender and Sexuality and Resisting the State:

“Never doubt that a few committed people can change Canada (and the world) for the better. Scott Neigh’s oral histories show not only the power of committed idealism, but also how the history of our whole country has been shaped by brave Canadians who refuse to accept the misery and injustice that surrounds us. Read these books to learn how the history of social change organizing is indeed the history of Canada — and then go out and start making your own history.” — Jim Stanford, union economist and peace activist

“This work is a treasure that provides a portal to Canadian history, bringing it alive and urgent through the voices and profound insights of veteran social justice activists, an indispensable guide for present and future generations to carry on these struggles.” — Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, veteran activist and author

And even more.

Scott Neigh is a writer, parent, and activist currently based in Sudbury, Ontario. He lived in Hamilton, Ontario, from 1993 until 2004, where he was active in student, anti-poverty, anti-racism, environmental, and other social justice organizing, including as a board member of OPIRG McMaster. He blogs regularly on political topics at A Canadian Lefty in Occupied Land. You can learn more about these books and the project of which they are a part at the Talking Radical site, and more about Scott here.

This event is sponsored by OPIRG McMaster, Bryan Prince Bookseller, and Fernwood Publishing.

Posted in Event | 1 Comment

Radio — Radicalizing body positivity politics

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, Scott Neigh speaks with Tameera Mohamed. Last year, she and some of her friends became frustrated with the narrow and limited scope of mainstream (including mainstream feminist) politics focused on the body. In response, they founded the collective Our Resilient Bodies to bring a radical, intersectional, feminist lens to bear and to expand the range of conversations and actions happening related to body positivity (broadly understood) in the Halifax community.

TRR_jul18-22_2016_our_resilient_bodies_rect

“Body positivity” is, if not exactly a movement, then an idea and a politics rooted in an important feminist insight but with reach far beyond. The idea that putting people down because their body doesn’t meet a certain ideal resonates with a lot of different kinds of experiences, and not only is it an initial point of political engagement for many young feminists, but it has become a piece of commonsense among many otherwise apolitical people and even a theme in more than a few corporate advertising campaigns.

While in some ways this is an encouraging sign of ongoing feminist capacity to nudge the broader culture in positive directions, the problem is that both the more broadly distributed version of body positivity and indeed the most common feminist understandings of it tend to focus on a relatively narrow and privileged range of bodies and issues — white cisgender straight women whose bodies deviate from the dominant ideal, but not too much, and solutions organized around individualized notions of self-love and self-care.

Tameera Mohamed is a 22 year-old cisgender queer woman of colour who lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She and the other people in Our Resilient Bodies certainly agree that the ways that certain bodies get shamed or marginalized or denigrated or excluded can be a powerful starting point for people to engage politically with their own experiences and with the world. But they see so much more to such politics than is conventionally allowed — they see radical, anti-racist, queer-and-trans, intersectional potential, and they’re determined to act on that.

Their main path to action has been collective educational tools: They began with an intense, week-long series of workshops late last year, along with a zine. They got a great response and at that point decided to become an ongoing collective. Since then, they’ve put on many more events and workshops on an wide range of body-related themes. The events have included topics like decolonizing desireability, fatphobia, mainstream Pride celebrations and colonialism, menstruation, a number on various aspects of eating disorders, femme-phobia in queer communities, life drawing of marginalized bodies, a queer feminist porn screening, and lots more. They aim to create spaces where people can talk about their experiences, develop critical insights and more radical and nuanced politics, and build supportive community with those who have both similar and different experiences of marginalization. They want to ask, “How do racism, colorism, ableism, cissexism, sexism, classism, and heterosexism inform our understandings of beauty, desirability, and our lived experiences within our own bodies?” One of their major focuses in coming months will be extending their reach and doing outreach and events in various parts of rural Nova Scotia. I speak with Mohamed about Our Resilient Bodies, about their work so far, and about bringing a radical, intersectional, anti-oppressive lens to body positivity.

To learn more about Our Resilient Bodies, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Challenging the marginalization of African refugees

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Kimbra Yohannes and Daniel Tseghay. They are members of We Welcome African Refugees, a new organization working to challenge the marginalization of refugees from African countries in public conversation and public policy in Canada, and to implement a new model of community organizing.

TRR_jul11-15_2016_we_welcome_african_refugees_rect

In the last year, the issues of refugees have been part of the dominant public conversation in Canada like never before. Everyone has heard at least some version of the the situation in Syria and the experiences of those who have fled, and despite a certain amount of racism and resistance, efforts to modestly increase and accelerate the admission of Syrian refugees to Canada have been quite broadly embraced by many Canadians.

Over this time, though, Yohannes, Tseghay, and many other people who are part of communities in Canada with roots in various African countries, have noticed something odd about both the public conversation and about the measures enacted by the Canadian government to respond to the refugee crisis. Yohannes and Tseghay are emphatically supportive of Syrian refugees, and in fact argue that Canada should be admitting many, many more Syrians and giving them much better support when they arrive. But they wonder why Africans, who comprise a significant part of global flows of refugees, are so absent from public attention, and at times even get scant attention within some migrant justice contexts. Furthermore, they note that Africans have been pointedly excluded from the modest government efforts to increase and ease admissions to Canada, and that even the government processing of requests for private sponsorships of African refugees remains uncertain and often extremely slow. This exclusion is happening despite the fact that Canada and other Western countries are often very complicit in the circumstances in many African countries that people are fleeing. Both Yohannes and Tseghay are Eritrean, for instance, and Canadian mining companies are very much complicit in (that is, are profiting from) the repressive regime that upwards of 5000 Eritreans per month are risking their lives to escape. The ongoing marginalization faced by refugees from African countries is yet another expression of the anti-Black racism that causes such harm in Canada and globally.

We Welcome African Refugees aims to make African refugees part of the public conversation in Canada, and to push the responses of the Canadian public and the Canadian state to the global refugee crisis to include measures that centre African refugees. But that is not all the group is attempting to do: They are working to create a new organizing model that is rooted in the communities in question in robust grassroots ways. They are currently fundraising to hire part-time organizers in Vancouver, Toronto, and either Edmonton or Calgary, who will do the slow but vital work of connecting with and bringing together people from diverse African communities, who in turn will take leadership of the process and advance a set of priorities and actions that will truly address the needs their people face.

Yohannes and Tseghay speak with me about the experiences of refugees from Eritrea and other African countries, about the marginalization of African refugees within popular discourse and government policy in Canada, and about the new grassroots model that We Welcome African Refugees is using to challenge this marginalization.

To learn more about We Welcome African Refugees, check out their page on Facebook. To donate to their current fundraising campaign, go to their page on GoFundMe.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio: Learning for today from working-class history

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with York University labour historian Craig Heron about his multiple award-winning book Lunch-Bucket Lives: Remaking the Workers’ City (Between the Lines, 2015), and about what movements today can gain from paying attention to the past.

TRR_jul4-8_2016_lunchbucket_lives_rect

How did ordinary people who came before us live? How did they struggle against oppression and injustice? Once upon a time, history — meaning the academic discipline — couldn’t answer those questions and really didn’t care. That began to change as the social movements of the 1960s and 1970s swept through universities, and a new generation of historians began to do their work differently — to take seriously voices and stories previously excluded, such as those of women and people of colour and workers, and to re-narrate the past we all share in ways that took them seriously.

Craig Heron was a white working-class Ontario kid who was politicized as a university student during those turbulent years. He went on to become a labour historian, and he has taught history and labour studies at York University in Toronto for more than three decades. His latest book, Lunch-Bucket Lives, is a massive study of working-class life in the industrial city of Hamilton, Ontario, between 1890 and 1940. It brings together examinations of all manner of changes across multiple aspects of life in the workplace, the household, and the community. It explores what working people in that era did to survive under very harsh conditions — often, Heron suggests, they took an approach he describes as “working-class realism” that manifested in different ways through survival strategies at individual, household, and community levels, but which also, at least sometimes, included moments of collective confrontation with the powers that be through strikes, efforts to unionize, riots, and the creation of independent working-class political organizations.

This detailed examination of collective resistance that — and this is crucial — places it firmly in the broader context of everyday life may assist movements today in making decisions about how to organize and mobilize in increasingly stark times. Moreover, Heron points out that the era covered by the book may be particularly relevant to today’s struggles, as the unfettered capiatlism, precarious employment, grinding poverty, and near total absence of a social safety net at that time closely resembles what for the last thirty years the forces of neoliberalism have been relentlessly trying to return us to. Heron speaks me about working-class life and resistance in early 20th century Ontario, and about the relevance of history to social movements today.

To learn more about the book, check out its page on the Between the Lines site or this review.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Smashing the patriarchy in Newfoundland

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Jessica Barry and Nicole Collins. They are members of Smash Patriarchy: An Action Team (or SPAAT), a feminist group that has been part of a broader resurgence in feminist action over the last year in St. John’s, Newfoundland.

TRR_jun27-jul1_2016_spaat_rect

The initial catalyst for SPAAT to come together was something quite specific: A number of women with long-time connections of one sort or another to the city’s music scene were becoming increasingly frustrated at how unwelcoming a space it was for them. Though there was certainly a deep reservoir of concern about things like how venues handle harassment and assault, the trigger was actually a summer of successive music festivals in St. John’s with very, very few women musicians. As the final festival of the year approached — with its all-dude line-up — something sparked, and in a few short weeks, a collection of mostly-women who didn’t even really know each other very well had planned their own show for the same night featuring a number of woman-fronted bands, produced a zine exploring the many barriers faced by women in the music scene, and begun to build an organization.

From there, though they still have a keen interest in music and culture, the group has expanded its focus. When they found out a nightclub was bringing a highly prominent online misogynist to the city for a public event, they started a petition, did media work, and planned a counter-event. When a firefighter in a nearby town was subjected to sexual harassment and then ostracized when she spoke out, they organized a number of events and actions to support her. When the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary released a public service announcement about date rape that was blatant victim-blaming, they took to social media, did a bunch of interviews, and mobilized a firestorm of criticism, and within 24 hours the police had agreed to completely change their messaging. One of their current priorities is developing resources and guidelines around sexual assault and harassment in community contexts — what venues should be doing to create safer spaces, and how communities can respond when something happens. And they are part of a collection of feminist groups in the city that are putting together a major conference that will be happening in August. And after that — well, they’re hoping to draw some new members into their core group between now and the fall, and they plan to set the next phase of their agenda from there.

To learn more about Smash Patriarchy: An Action Team, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Defending public healthcare in court and in the streets

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Edith Machattie and Jen Kuhl of the BC Health Coalition. They talk with me about the coalition’s work to defend and improve public healthcare, including their intervention in opposition to the legal challenge that could be the single gravest threat that the system currently faces.

TRR_jun20-24_2016_bc_health_coalition_rect

There are lots of ways that are grounded in questions of justice to be critical about how healthcare happens in this country. These range from the most basic questions about how different populations are able to access healthcare resources, to concerns about how power imbalances between professionals and patients shape decision-making about care, to critiques of pervasive medicalization of everyday life, to radical explorations of how both dominant and supposedly “alternative” medical practices and discourses are wound together with things like capitalism, colonialism, and patriarchy. Yet none of these provide any basis for thinking that things would improve by compromising the imperfect but still substantial equality of access in the Canadian single-payer model by allowing rich people to pay their way to better care than everyone else, thus making things increasingly like the horrendously unequal and terribly inefficient US system.

In British Columbia, a lawsuit is looming that could do just that. After much manouvering, a number of years ago the BC government finally managed to conduct an audit on a private surgery clinic in Vancouver. In looking at just 30 days of its operation, they found that this clinic charged almost half a million dollars of fees to patients that they were not allowed to charge. In response, the clinic’s owners and a number of similar clinics launched a constitutional challenge to BC’s medicare laws. If this suit is successful, it could do a great deal to undermine public medicare in Canada, and would create much greater legal space for two-tier, for-profit, privatized care in this country.

The BC Health Coalition brings together community and labour groups from across British Columbia. Machattie is an occupational therapist, a union representative on the coalition’s steering committee, and its co-chair. Jen Kuhl is a staffer with the coalition. In the decade and a half of the coalition’s existence, it has engaged in numerous different campaigns online and on the ground, mobilizing both the members of component organizations and the general public. The group is currently working hard to prepare its contribution to the proceedings that are scheduled to begin in the BC Supreme Court in September. Kuhl and Machattie speak with me about the work of the BC Health Coalition, the importance of public health care, the legal challenge that threatens it, and ways we can all work politically to defend and improve it.

To learn more about the work of the BC Health Coalition, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Solidarity Winnipeg: Grassroots renewal against austerity in Manitoba

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Sofia Soriano and David Camfield. They are members of a new group called Solidarity Winnipeg, which aims to build grassroots momentum in the face of the newly intensified austerity agenda in the province of Manitoba.

TRR_jun13-17_2016_solidarity_winnipeg_rect

The total numbers involved are pretty small so far, but there are signs in communities across the country of an upswing in recent years in the number of people looking for some sort of collective, multi-issue, sustained organization as a mechanism for their involvement in struggles for social and ecological justice — and, for many, one that is not an electoral political party, with all of the tight constraints on political imagination and action that such organizations inevitably impose. This impulse has led people to experiment with a range of organizational possibilities, all the way from small, long-term, anti-authoritarian collectives, to hierarchical far-left party formations, and beyond. Another form that this experimentation has taken in a number of cities, however, has been to seek ways to bring people together in a formation that is both radical and broad. Often, these embrace a label like “anti-austerity” or “anti-capitalist,” though not always, and they work hard at welcoming a range of approaches and at avoiding the sectarianism that has been so destructive to movements in the past, while putting energy into campaigns on multiple issues. Solidarity Winnipeg is perhaps the newest example in the Canadian context of this sort of group.

Solidarity Winnipeg formed in November of 2015. The impetus was a recognition that there was a good chance that the Manitoba provincial election scheduled to happen in April of 2016 would bring the agenda of “neoliberalism” and “austerity” to the province in a way that it had so far escaped. These buzzwords — neoliberalism and austerity — capture the relentless push by so many mainstream political parties around the world today towards cutting, privatizing, and deregulating in ways that hurt ordinary people and the environment. The founding of Solidarity Winnipeg was also a response to the weak and fragmented state of more grassroots and radical forces in the city. The goal of the group is to be a broad radical organization that unites people from a variety of political perspectives who share a commitment to the transformation of society towards social and ecological justice and who understand that struggle must be central to that. Solidarity Winnipeg did its best to bring people together and raise these grassroots concerns during the campaign period. And given that a new right-wing government did indeed come to power in the province, the group is hard at work strategizing about the best ways to respond to the government’s agenda — not in ways that rely on some other political party winning in four years time, but in a multi-issue, struggle-focused, non-sectarian way that will fight austerity and build grassroots power here and now.

Sofia Soriano is 23 years old, and is a dental assistant and a mother. David Camfield is 45 and he teaches at University of Manitoba. Both are involved in Solidarity Winnipeg. They speak with me about the peculiar political context of their province, about the work of Solidarity Winnipeg so far, and about the ongoing experiment of becoming a new kind of grassroots, multi-issue, non-sectarian radical formation.

To learn more about Solidarity Winnipeg, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Organizing very low-income tenants in the Downtown Eastside

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Wendy Pederson. She is an organizer with the Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative, a group that is organizing tenants in single-room occupancy (or SRO) hotels in Vancouver.

TRR_jun6-10_2016_dtes_sro_collaborative_rect

The Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver is the poorest urban neighbourhood in Canada. It has a very high proportion of residents living on low and extremely low incomes. Given that governments in this country have done next to nothing to address housing issues in the last two decades, many residents of the Downtown Eastside have only one option other than living on the streets: renting a room in an SRO hotel. These buildings contain small, individual rooms for rent, often with no kitchen facilities whatsoever and a shared bathroom down the hall. Many of the hundred or so buildings that house the 5000+ SRO units in the Downtown Eastside are old, some surpassing the century mark, and many landlords are unwilling to invest the money necessary to maintain them. This means that living conditions in many of them span the range from poor to utterly appalling. At the same time, rents are going up: the average SRO rent in the neighbourhood is already well above the shelter allowance portion of welfare payments in British Columbia. And the entire neighbourhood is under threat from gentrification, as investors seek to buy SRO hotels and other properties so they can change how they’re used, displace existing residents, re-make the neighbourhood, and profit extensively from the fact that urban Vancouver is one of the most expensive real estate markets in the country.

The Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative is a relatively new organization based on a model that is used extensively in San Francisco — one of the few places in North America where low-income tenants are under even more severe threat than in Vancouver. The idea is to work with tenants of a given SRO hotel to set up a tenant committee in the building, to help them develop knowledge about their rights and about the system as well as skills for community organizing and leadership, and to focus on using a combination of political pressure and legal mechanisms to force landlords to improve the living conditions in the building. This organizing (with its focus on habitability) improves the lives of tenants, builds their collective power in one building, and creates a basis for broader political campaigns spanning multiple buildings or even the entire neighbourhood.

The Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative got initial funding from a local non-profit housing provider and has had success in organizing tenants in six SRO hotels, including four of the worst in the neighbourhood. They have won some significant victories already, despite the relatively early stage of the work, and the backlash they have faced from landlords has been intense. They are scrambling to make sure they have funding in place for the coming year, and are hopeful they’ll be able to expand their reach to ten buildings. Whether it is through expanding their own capacity or helping other collaboratives form independently, they are keen to see this approach to organizing spread — and spread quickly — to improve the lives of low-income tenants, to defend and improve the low-income housing that currently exists, to act against gentrification, and in the longer term to win the massive new investment in social housing that tenants in the Downtown Eastside so desperately need. To learn more about the work of the Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment