Hamilton Book Launch

Date: November 8
Time: 7pm
Location: Room 1010, Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Learning (MDCL), McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario

Join author and activist Scott Neigh for a talk and book signing as he launches two new books published by Fernwood Publishing: Gender and Sexuality: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists and Resisting the State: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists. Hear about some of the many struggles that have shaped the Canada of today, and talk about new ways of relating to the past as we struggle for a transformed tomorrow.

To learn more about the books and the project of which they are a part, and to read and hear excerpts from the interviews around which the books are organized, visit here. To find out about ways to purchase the books if you can’t make it to the launch, click here.

From the book jackets:

We usually learn our history from the perspective of our rulers — from the top down. In these books we learn about our history from the perspectives of ordinary people — from the bottom up. Whatever liberty and justice that communities, workplaces and individuals in Canada enjoy are due to the many struggles and social movements in our country’s history. Yet the stories and histories of those movements to overcome racism, sexism, and poverty, for example, remain largely untold, thanks to the single, simplistic national story taught to us in school. Deftly combining history with accounts from participants in social movements, Neigh introduces us to the untold histories of activists, histories that encourage all of us to engage in struggles that will shape our shared tomorrow.

Gender and Sexuality unearths a diverse spectrum of struggle through the accounts of longstanding social movement participants. From indigenous women working against colonization and Christian women trying to end sexism and homophobia in their churches, to gay men opposing sexual oppression and women fighting against hostile employers and violence, this book reveals the ways that oppressions based on gender and sexuality — and the struggles against them — have shaped our society.

In Resisting the State, Neigh details the histories of a broad range of social movements and provides readers with a richer understanding of the Canadian state and why so many people — including military draftees, welfare recipients, workers, indigenous people, psychiatric survivors, immigrants and refugees — have struggled, and continue to struggle, for equality and justice for all members of society.

What people are saying about Gender and Sexuality and Resisting the State:

“Never doubt that a few committed people can change Canada (and the world) for the better. Scott Neigh’s oral histories show not only the power of committed idealism, but also how the history of our whole country has been shaped by brave Canadians who refuse to accept the misery and injustice that surrounds us. Read these books to learn how the history of social change organizing is indeed the history of Canada — and then go out and start making your own history.” — Jim Stanford, union economist and peace activist

“This work is a treasure that provides a portal to Canadian history, bringing it alive and urgent through the voices and profound insights of veteran social justice activists, an indispensable guide for present and future generations to carry on these struggles.” — Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, veteran activist and author

And even more.

Scott Neigh is a writer, parent, and activist currently based in Sudbury, Ontario. He lived in Hamilton, Ontario, from 1993 until 2004, where he was active in student, anti-poverty, anti-racism, environmental, and other social justice organizing, including as a board member of OPIRG McMaster. He blogs regularly on political topics at A Canadian Lefty in Occupied Land. You can learn more about these books and the project of which they are a part at the Talking Radical site, and more about Scott here.

This event is sponsored by OPIRG McMaster, Bryan Prince Bookseller, and Fernwood Publishing.

Posted in Event | 1 Comment

Radio — Defending public healthcare in court and in the streets

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Edith Machattie and Jen Kuhl of the BC Health Coalition. They talk with me about the coalition’s work to defend and improve public healthcare, including their intervention in opposition to the legal challenge that could be the single gravest threat that the system currently faces.

TRR_jun20-24_2016_bc_health_coalition_rect

There are lots of ways that are grounded in questions of justice to be critical about how healthcare happens in this country. These range from the most basic questions about how different populations are able to access healthcare resources, to concerns about how power imbalances between professionals and patients shape decision-making about care, to critiques of pervasive medicalization of everyday life, to radical explorations of how both dominant and supposedly “alternative” medical practices and discourses are wound together with things like capitalism, colonialism, and patriarchy. Yet none of these provide any basis for thinking that things would improve by compromising the imperfect but still substantial equality of access in the Canadian single-payer model by allowing rich people to pay their way to better care than everyone else, thus making things increasingly like the horrendously unequal and terribly inefficient US system.

In British Columbia, a lawsuit is looming that could do just that. After much manouvering, a number of years ago the BC government finally managed to conduct an audit on a private surgery clinic in Vancouver. In looking at just 30 days of its operation, they found that this clinic charged almost half a million dollars of fees to patients that they were not allowed to charge. In response, the clinic’s owners and a number of similar clinics launched a constitutional challenge to BC’s medicare laws. If this suit is successful, it could do a great deal to undermine public medicare in Canada, and would create much greater legal space for two-tier, for-profit, privatized care in this country.

The BC Health Coalition brings together community and labour groups from across British Columbia. Machattie is an occupational therapist, a union representative on the coalition’s steering committee, and its co-chair. Jen Kuhl is a staffer with the coalition. In the decade and a half of the coalition’s existence, it has engaged in numerous different campaigns online and on the ground, mobilizing both the members of component organizations and the general public. The group is currently working hard to prepare its contribution to the proceedings that are scheduled to begin in the BC Supreme Court in September. Kuhl and Machattie speak with me about the work of the BC Health Coalition, the importance of public health care, the legal challenge that threatens it, and ways we can all work politically to defend and improve it.

To learn more about the work of the BC Health Coalition, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Solidarity Winnipeg: Grassroots renewal against austerity in Manitoba

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Sofia Soriano and David Camfield. They are members of a new group called Solidarity Winnipeg, which aims to build grassroots momentum in the face of the newly intensified austerity agenda in the province of Manitoba.

TRR_jun13-17_2016_solidarity_winnipeg_rect

The total numbers involved are pretty small so far, but there are signs in communities across the country of an upswing in recent years in the number of people looking for some sort of collective, multi-issue, sustained organization as a mechanism for their involvement in struggles for social and ecological justice — and, for many, one that is not an electoral political party, with all of the tight constraints on political imagination and action that such organizations inevitably impose. This impulse has led people to experiment with a range of organizational possibilities, all the way from small, long-term, anti-authoritarian collectives, to hierarchical far-left party formations, and beyond. Another form that this experimentation has taken in a number of cities, however, has been to seek ways to bring people together in a formation that is both radical and broad. Often, these embrace a label like “anti-austerity” or “anti-capitalist,” though not always, and they work hard at welcoming a range of approaches and at avoiding the sectarianism that has been so destructive to movements in the past, while putting energy into campaigns on multiple issues. Solidarity Winnipeg is perhaps the newest example in the Canadian context of this sort of group.

Solidarity Winnipeg formed in November of 2015. The impetus was a recognition that there was a good chance that the Manitoba provincial election scheduled to happen in April of 2016 would bring the agenda of “neoliberalism” and “austerity” to the province in a way that it had so far escaped. These buzzwords — neoliberalism and austerity — capture the relentless push by so many mainstream political parties around the world today towards cutting, privatizing, and deregulating in ways that hurt ordinary people and the environment. The founding of Solidarity Winnipeg was also a response to the weak and fragmented state of more grassroots and radical forces in the city. The goal of the group is to be a broad radical organization that unites people from a variety of political perspectives who share a commitment to the transformation of society towards social and ecological justice and who understand that struggle must be central to that. Solidarity Winnipeg did its best to bring people together and raise these grassroots concerns during the campaign period. And given that a new right-wing government did indeed come to power in the province, the group is hard at work strategizing about the best ways to respond to the government’s agenda — not in ways that rely on some other political party winning in four years time, but in a multi-issue, struggle-focused, non-sectarian way that will fight austerity and build grassroots power here and now.

Sofia Soriano is 23 years old, and is a dental assistant and a mother. David Camfield is 45 and he teaches at University of Manitoba. Both are involved in Solidarity Winnipeg. They speak with me about the peculiar political context of their province, about the work of Solidarity Winnipeg so far, and about the ongoing experiment of becoming a new kind of grassroots, multi-issue, non-sectarian radical formation.

To learn more about Solidarity Winnipeg, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Organizing very low-income tenants in the Downtown Eastside

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Wendy Pederson. She is an organizer with the Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative, a group that is organizing tenants in single-room occupancy (or SRO) hotels in Vancouver.

TRR_jun6-10_2016_dtes_sro_collaborative_rect

The Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver is the poorest urban neighbourhood in Canada. It has a very high proportion of residents living on low and extremely low incomes. Given that governments in this country have done next to nothing to address housing issues in the last two decades, many residents of the Downtown Eastside have only one option other than living on the streets: renting a room in an SRO hotel. These buildings contain small, individual rooms for rent, often with no kitchen facilities whatsoever and a shared bathroom down the hall. Many of the hundred or so buildings that house the 5000+ SRO units in the Downtown Eastside are old, some surpassing the century mark, and many landlords are unwilling to invest the money necessary to maintain them. This means that living conditions in many of them span the range from poor to utterly appalling. At the same time, rents are going up: the average SRO rent in the neighbourhood is already well above the shelter allowance portion of welfare payments in British Columbia. And the entire neighbourhood is under threat from gentrification, as investors seek to buy SRO hotels and other properties so they can change how they’re used, displace existing residents, re-make the neighbourhood, and profit extensively from the fact that urban Vancouver is one of the most expensive real estate markets in the country.

The Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative is a relatively new organization based on a model that is used extensively in San Francisco — one of the few places in North America where low-income tenants are under even more severe threat than in Vancouver. The idea is to work with tenants of a given SRO hotel to set up a tenant committee in the building, to help them develop knowledge about their rights and about the system as well as skills for community organizing and leadership, and to focus on using a combination of political pressure and legal mechanisms to force landlords to improve the living conditions in the building. This organizing (with its focus on habitability) improves the lives of tenants, builds their collective power in one building, and creates a basis for broader political campaigns spanning multiple buildings or even the entire neighbourhood.

The Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative got initial funding from a local non-profit housing provider and has had success in organizing tenants in six SRO hotels, including four of the worst in the neighbourhood. They have won some significant victories already, despite the relatively early stage of the work, and the backlash they have faced from landlords has been intense. They are scrambling to make sure they have funding in place for the coming year, and are hopeful they’ll be able to expand their reach to ten buildings. Whether it is through expanding their own capacity or helping other collaboratives form independently, they are keen to see this approach to organizing spread — and spread quickly — to improve the lives of low-income tenants, to defend and improve the low-income housing that currently exists, to act against gentrification, and in the longer term to win the massive new investment in social housing that tenants in the Downtown Eastside so desperately need. To learn more about the work of the Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Organizing to put the Leap Manifesto to work

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Bianca Mugyenyi and Martin Lukacs about being part of the team of people who has been working hard to turn the inspiring words of the Leap Manifesto into grassroots political power on the ground.

TRR_may30-jun3_2016_leap_manifesto_organizing_rect

The Leap Manifesto was launched in September 2015. Earlier in that year, a small group of journalist-activists — most notably Naomi Klein, author of This Changes Everything about the climate crisis — had convened a gathering of leaders, representatives, organizers, and activists from a broad cross section of social movements and communities-in-struggle in the Canadian context. It was that gathering that produced the 1400 word manifesto. Even before its launch, it had been endorsed not only by many labour, environmental, Indigenous, and progressive faith organizations, and by political figures like Stephen Lewis and Canadian Labour Congress president Hassan Yussuff, but also by many Canadian artists, actors, and celebrities, from Ellen Page to Ashley Callingbull, Leonard Cohen to Rachel McAdams, Donald Sutherland to Michael Ondaatje. And when the Leap Manifesto was released in September, the nation’s attention was already on political questions because the federal election that ultimately led to the downfall of Stephen Harper’s Conservatives was in full swing. All of the ingredients were in place to generate the kind of attention that a sweeping vision for change of this sort hasn’t received in Canada in generations.

Martin Lukacs writes for the UK-based newspaper The Guardian, and he has been involved in research, in organizing the initial meetings that wrote the manifesto, and in communications strategy for the project. Bianca Mugyenyi joined the project in the summer of 2015 as an organizer and as the project’s outreach coordinator.

The Leap Manifesto begins from the multiple crises facing Canada — climate change, deepening poverty and inequality, histories and current realities of colonialism, exclusions based on race and gender and citizenship, and much more. It sees these crises as inextricably linked, and argues that any effective paths to addressing them must recognize these interconnections. It paints a broad vision for change, but avoids getting stuck in the utopian by demanding concrete steps to begin moving in that direction. It calls for Canada to respect the treaties with and inherent rights of Indigenous peoples; to grant immigration status to all migrant workers; to end the construction of new fossil fuel extraction infrastructure and move to green energy and a green economy on demanding but do-able timelines; to resolutely oppose anti-democratic trade deals and government policies of austerity; to support Indigenous and other frontline communities first during the transition away from fossil fuels; to implement a massive green infrastructure program; to invest in re-training impacted workers; and to put in place new supports for low-carbon sectors of the economy, which it understands to include not just things like installing solar panels but also existing low-carbon work like services, arts, media, and the extensive waged and unwaged caring labour that we all depend on. Since it has been released, it has been the target of criticism from some elements on the radical left — including for the fact that it is not explicitly anti-capitalist and that the process that produced it was not broader and more grassroots — and, much more visibly, from a mainstream that stretches from some conservative social democrats to the hard right of the Canadian elite, for its significant challenge to the status quo in this country.

In my conversation with Mugyenyi and Lukacs, rather than focusing on the content of the document — I encourage listeners to read it for themselves — we talk mostly about the hard work of the many people that produced it, that released it, and that are now organizing around it to bring that content to life. On today’s show, you can hear about what Mugyenyi, Lukacs, and many others have done and continue to do to use the Leap Manifesto as a tool to build towards a just, sustainable future.

To learn more about the Leap Manifesto, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Colonialism No More

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Su Deranger and Robyn Pitawanakwat about the Colonialism No More camp taking place outside of the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) building in Regina, Saskatchewan.

TRR_may23-27_2016_colonialism_no_more_rect

On April 9, the band council of Attawapiskat First Nation in northern Ontario declared a state of emergency because of a wave of suicide attempts in the community — around 100 since the previous September. This brought a surge of attention from mainstream media and from prominent politicians. It also sparked some Indigenous activists in Toronto and their allies (including from the local chapter of Black Lives Matter) to occupy the local offices of INAC in solidarity. Similar actions followed in other cities, including Winnipeg and Vancouver.

People also decided to act in solidarity in Regina. They began with a lunch-hour demonstration on Friday, April 15th. When they discovered that the INAC office had locked its doors, they decided to show up again early Monday morning to be there and present their concerns to the staff as soon as the doors opened. Except the doors didn’t open that day. So the activists began the process of setting up a tent city outside of the INAC building in Regina under the banner of Colonialism No More. Though the solidarity occupations of INAC offices in other cities have ended, the Colonialism No More camp is still there and going strong.

Colonialism No More wants to support the youth of Attawapiskat, but they also want to draw attention to similar crises in Indigenous communities in Saskatchewan and across Canada. They want INAC to share whatever information they have about the current situations of Indigenous communities in Saksatchewan, and they want to hear what INAC intends to do in response. They want to emphasize that communities know what they need, know what their problems are, know how to address them, they just need the resources to do it. And they want to be perfectly clear that underlying the suicide crisis in Attawapiskat and in so many other Indigenous communities, and underlying the other intelocking problems that many Indigenous communities face across the country, is colonialism.

Robyn Pitawanakwat is a member of Whitefish River First Nation and she grew up in Regina. She is the child of a long-time Indigenous community activist, and she has become active herself in recent years, initially around questions of racist policing in the city. Su Deranger is a member of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation. She has been involved in Indigenous struggles and in a wide range of other social movements since the early 1970s, and she is overjoyed by the Colonialism No More camp, which she takes to be the start of a genuine “autonomous people’s social movement.” Pitawanakwat and Deranger speak with me about colonialism in Canada and the Colonialism No More camp in Regina.

To learn more about Colonialism No More, you can follow them on Facebook or Twitter.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — The Urban Worker Project: A new organization for new forms of work

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Andrew Cash. He was a member of Parliament from 2011 to 2015, and he is a co-founder of the Urban Worker Project.

TRR_may16-20_2016_urban_worker_project_rect

It should not be news to anybody that work, jobs, and the economy have changed a lot over the last few decades. Lots of people were excluded from them even then, but during the post-Second World War economic boom, many people could at least aspire to the new and unprecedented layer of secure, regular, well-paying jobs with good benefits and a pension. Today, however, fewer and fewer such jobs exist. In the 21st century, jobs that fail to give access to security and prosperity are increasingly becoming the norm (though even within that, there is a broad range of kinds of work, kinds of jobs, and intensities of marginalization and exploitation).

Before Andrew Cash was an MP, he spent more than 25 years cobbling together a living in one corner of the broad umbrella that is precarious work, in his case in the arts and culture sector. In fact, it was an interest in getting meaningful government action around the needs of what he has come to think of as “urban workers” that initially inspired him to enter electoral politics. By that category, he means contract, freelance and micro-self-employed workers, often in areas like arts, culture and knowledge work (which includes things like freelance journalism, precarious academic labour, and much contract work in the not-for-profit sector). Though workers in these areas are often assumed to be middle-class, the picture tends to be much more complex than the image of easy and stable economic well-being that we still often associate with that label. Even if wages and conditions for some of them are often better than in more marginal forms of precarious work, urban workers still generally have no job security, no benefits, no access to sick days, no pension, no access to the protection of employment standards, and not even particularly good access to social programs should a crisis hit them or their family.

As an MP, Cash tabled and worked to generate considerable community support for a multi-faceted private member’s bill that, had it passed, would have started the federal government down the path of addressing these issues. After losing his seat in the election last October, Cash decided that he couldn’t just let these issues drop, and he and a small group of other urban workers launched the Urban Worker Project in March of 2016. It aims to animate and frame public conversations around the struggles of freelance, contract and self-employed workers; to build community and a cohesive constituency of such workers, both online and through in-person events across the country; and to mobilize people in support of specific campaigns and demands.

Cash talks with me about his own experiences of precarious work in the arts and culture sector, about the importance of doing more to protect and support workers in a radically changed world of work, and about the Urban Worker Project.

To learn more about the Urban Worker Project, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Radio — Solidarity from Atlantic Canada to Latin and Central America

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

On this week’s episode of Talking Radical Radio, I speak with Jackie McVicar. She is a member of the Atlantic Regional Solidarity Network (ARSN), which brings together groups and individuals from across the Maritimes who are interested in working in solidarity with the peoples of Latin and Central America.

TRR_may9-13_2016_atlantic_regional_solidarity_network_rect

“Solidarity” is a word you hear a lot in the context of struggles for social justice. At it’s most basic, it just means that a group of people — a group of co-workers, a group of neighbours — have each other’s back, that they recognize they’ll all end up farther ahead if they stick together. Whatever the context, solidarity is something that takes work. You can’t just assume it; you have to create it and enact it. There are some contexts, though, that make enacting meaningful solidarity in politically appropriate ways even trickier. For instance, differences in experience and differences in power among those attempting to create solidarity can be a real barrier. Physical distance can also make creating solidarity more challenging, because if you are far away it can be very difficult even to know about struggles you wish to support, let alone act to support them in meaningful ways.

When it comes to activists in rich countries like Canada acting in solidarity with people in the Global South, both of those complications can be at work. It’s tempting, therefore, to not bother — to say, well, yes, the struggles going on in Guatemala or Honduras or Brazil are important and we wish people in those countries well, but we’ve got our own struggles going on here and we’re just going to focus on those. What that stance fails to reckon with, however, is that political responsibility doesn’t stop at borders. The fact is, we are already connected to struggles in many parts of the Global South because of active participation by the Canadian state and Canadian corporations in the very things that popular movements in those countries are trying to change. One major component of this is the extensive involvement by Canadian corporations in mining and other kinds of resource extraction projects that are harming communities around the world, and that popular movements are working hard to oppose.

Though the issues are immense and their capacity is more limited than they would like, the organizations and activists in the ARSN network do what they can to support struggles by the peoples of these regions for self-determination, and to act to create change in the Canadian context that will be beneficial to those struggles. Founded in the heydey of Latin American solidarity organizing in the 1980s, the network includes both representatives of funded organizations — McVicar herself works for an international NGO called Breaking the Silence — as well as grassroots groups and individual activists.

McVicar talks with me about ARSN, about Canadian complicity in global injustice (particularly when it comes to extractive industries), and about the challenges of international solidarity.

To learn more about the Atlantic Regional Solidarity Network, click here.

Talking Radical Radio brings you grassroots voices from across Canada. We give you the chance to hear many different people that are facing many different struggles talk about what they do, why they do it, and how they do it, in the belief that such listening is a crucial step in strengthening all of our efforts to change the world. To learn more about the show in general, visit its website here. You can learn about suggesting topics for future shows here.

Talking Radical Radio is brought to you by Scott Neigh, a writer, media producer, and activist based in Hamilton (formerly Sudbury), Ontario, and the author of two books examining Canadian history through the stories of activists.

Posted in Episode, Radio | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment